Embalming Education
By the 1880's embalming was becoming more
popular with undertakers, mostly due to the rising
number of companies who produced the necessary
chemicals. As the industry grew, most embalming
training came from the sales reps of various casket
and embalming fluid companies. With a few hours
of training, one could receive a certificate or
diploma. Eventually these courses in usage led to
the formation of schools of embalming.
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Mortuary Education
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By the end of the 1800's there were several
schools established in various parts of the
country, for teaching the art of embalming. One
of the first was established by John H. Clarke, a
salesman for an Indiana casket company. It was
first known as "The Clarke School of
Embalming", and later renamed "The Cincinnati
School of Embalming". Clarke's school is still in
existence today as, "The Cincinnati College of
Mortuary Science".
Schools of Embalming
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The Cincinnati College of Mortuary Science
Est. 1887